Building
SmartCode
The SmartCode was adopted as a result of the Old Town Master Plan, which called for a form-based development code within the Historical Overlay District. Instead of separating retail, commercial, office, and residential uses as the former zoning ordinance did, the SmartCode promotes a mixture of compatible uses in a pedestrian-oriented built environment.

Outside of Old Town, a property of at least 80 contiguous acres may request a rezoning to develop under the SmartCode.

The following transects are specifically calibrated for the Old Town Historic District.

The SmartCode can be found here.
Current Hutto Maps, including the Old Town transect map, can be found here.

Old Town Transects
OTtrans

OT-3: Traditional Neighborhood
OT-3 is a primarily residential district with larger blocks and deeper setbacks than other parts of Old Town.

OT-4R: Urban Residential
OT-4R is a mixed-use, but predominantly residential transect. Building types include houses, townhouses and small apartments, with corner commercial activity.

OT-4T: Transition
OT-4T serves as a transitional zone between historic downtown and the residential neighborhood. Buildings are generally residential and may also accommodate retail, offices and personal services.

OT-5H: Historic
OT-5H contains Hutto’s downtown core, a mixed-use neighborhood with historic and new shops, restaurants, offices, civic buildings, live-work units and apartments. Buildings are oriented toward the street, defining a street wall.

OT-5C: Co-Op
OT-5C is the most urban zone, offering the greatest variety of uses, highest height, and significant civic buildings.

SD-A: Special District Arterial

SD-A is made up of lower-density retail, office, and industrial uses in conventional suburban form.

Are you planning to build a structure in Old Town?
Please note that all new construction (buildings, accessory buildings, fences, other structures) visible from the public street requires a Certificate of Appropriateness prior to permits being issued. A Certificate of Appropriateness, or COA, is issued by the Historic Preservation Commission based on the proposed structure's compatibility with the historic district.

A Certificate of Appropriateness is also required for exterior modifications and additions to contributing structures. 

Do I need a Certificate of Appropriateness?

All new visible construction within Old Town requires a COA from the Historic Preservation Commission. New construction is subject to the architectural guidelines in the Old Town Master Plan and the standards of the SmartCode. Fences are considered new construction and therefore require a COA, with the exception of certain fence types in the OT-3 district. (See Map) Exterior changes to contributing structures, including new doors, window shutters, awnings, and railings, also require HPC approval.

Paint colors should be chosen from the approved list of historically appropriate paint colors. This list is provided by Benjamin Moore, but other brands may be used provided they match the approved list.

Maps of Old Town transects and  contributing structures can be found here.
COA applications and approved fence types in OT-3 can be found here.

Changes that do not require HPC approval include:
  • Exterior changes to non-contributing structures
  • Small, minor building or construction not visible to the public eye
  • Fences meeting pre-approved material and height specifications on properties within the OT-3 district
  • Temporary construction trailers for the use of on-site material storage during construction
  • Changes in paint color. Paint colors should be chosen from the approved list of historically appropriate paint colors. This list is provided by Benjamin Moore, but other brands may be used provided they match the approved list.
  • Ordinary maintenance and repair that does not involve changes in dimension, material, configuration, or outward appearance
  • Work that is required for a property to come into compliance with federal and state laws pertaining to persons with disabilities

For more information on Old Town Hutto, click here

How do I obtain a Certificate of Appropriateness?
All applications and fees can be found on the planning applications page. Please contact the planning division with any questions, or when you are ready to submit.  Meetings occur monthly, and complete applications are due no later than one week prior to the meeting.  Projects are subject to both the SmartCode and the Architectural Design Standards.

What if I make changes to the plans during construction, after the COA has been granted?
It is imperative that new construction matches approved plans precisely. Any desired changes or modifications to the approved plans require HPC re-review prior to the change being made. Any changes made without an amended COA are considered violations of City code. Structures that do not match the approved plans will not pass final inspections and therefore no Certificate of Occupancy shall be granted.

If unforeseen circumstances require that your approved plans be modified in any way, contact Planning staff immediately to be placed on an upcoming agenda. Do not proceed without an amended COA.

Are you planning to make modifications to a contributing structure in Old Town?
Similar to new construction in Old Town, exterior modifications to contributing structures require a Certificate of Appropriateness from the Historic Preservation Commission.

To learn whether a property is identified as Contributing, see the GIS page.

What kind of exterior modifications require a Certificate of Appropriateness?
Exterior changes requiring a COA include, but are not limited to:

  • doors
  • windows
  • window shutters
  • awnings
  • railings
  • porches and decks
  • building materials
  • roof materials
  • additions

What kind of exterior modifications can be made without a COA?
Changes that do not require HPC approval include:

  • Exterior changes to non-contributing structures
  • Small, minor building or construction not visible to the public eye
  • Fences meeting pre-approved material and height specifications on properties within the OT-3 district
  • Temporary construction trailers for the use of on-site material storage during construction
  • Changes in paint color. Click here for a list of historically appropriate colors.
  • Ordinary maintenance and repair that does not involve changes in dimension, material, configuration, or outward appearance
  • Work that is required for a property to come into compliance with federal and state laws pertaining to persons with disabilities

What if I need to make changes to an approved plan?
It is imperative that any work done matches approved plans precisely. Any desired changes or modifications to the approved plans require HPC re-review prior to the change being made. Any changes made without an amended COA are considered violations of City code. Structures that do not match the approved plans will not pass required inspections and will remain in violation until the issue is addressed.

If unforeseen circumstances require that your approved plans be modified in any way, contact Planning staff immediately to be placed on an upcoming agenda. Do not proceed with the changes without an amended COA.

OTMP Appendix B: Architectural Design Standards
The Historic Preservation Commission reviews Certificates of Appropriateness for their consistency with the Architectural Design Standards. Click here to view the Old Town Architectural Design Standards.

Historic Hutto Design Inspiration Library
The Design Inspiration Library is a collection of photos which reflect the character of Historic Hutto. The collection highlights desirable doors, porches, columns, lighting fixtures, and other significant architectural details which should be used as design inspiration for both new construction and renovation. Click here to view the Design Inspiration Library.
ArcStds2

ArcStds